Teresa Neigel

WELCOME TO THE JACKSON ART SPACE

Please feel free to contact me with any questions, comments or concerns.

Terry Neigel

tneigel@elmhurst205.org

Follow us on INSTAGRAM!

@JACKSONARTSPACE

PLEASE BE SURE YOUR STUDENT ARTIST HAS A SMOCK.

All students need a smock for the fun, messy and creative work we do. An old t-shirt or men's dress shirt is adequate. Please be sure your students' name is on the smock. Thank you!

DONATIONS

There are a number of things that you may no longer have a need for at home or at the office that we could use in the art room.  You can leave small items in the school office for me.  If you have a question about donating, please email me your questions.  Here is a list of some common "scrap" items that we would consider treasures:

Aluminum pie tins, trays or containers

Baby food jars with lids, plastic or glass

buttons, beads,  sequins

clipboards

yarn, thread, spools

newspapers

ribbons, trim, feathers

paper towel/tp tubes

small wood scraps

shoe polish in a tin

metal nuts and washers

fabric scraps

FUN AND EDUCATIONAL ART WEBSITES

TERESA NEIGEL LOCKER

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WELCOME TO THE JACKSON ART SPACE

Art provides unique opportunities to explore and develop ways of knowing, doing, and being. As such, art, as a core subject, …is a critical component in the development of every child and in multiple ways permeates every aspect of human existence. –U.S. Department of Education

WHY ART IS IMPORTANT FOR 21ST CENTURY LEARNERS

WHAT'S HAPPENING IN ART

Kindergarten students completed a project called "Texture Teddy"! Our fun bears have so much personality!

First-grade students are completing a project dealing with simulated texture. Next, we learn about real texture through a clay project.

Second-grade students are visualizing themselves as super heroes! They learned how to draw a correctly proportioned human figure and worked hard on improving their drawing skills.

Third-grade students have completed a Chinese Dragon paper sculpture and are beginning work on a figure in action relief sculpture.

Fourth-grade students completed a sculpture based on the art of James Castle.https://jamescastle.com/

Fifth-grade students are working on a unit involving the human figure. We are drawing from mannequins and creating figure sculptures, all with a focus on correct proportion and expression of action.

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10 LESSONS THE ARTS TEACH

10 Lessons the Arts Teach

1. The arts teach children to make good judgments about qualitative relationships.
Unlike much of the curriculum in which correct answers and rules prevail, in the arts, it is judgment rather than rules that prevail.

2. The arts teach children that problems can have more than one solution and that questions can have more than one answer.

3. The arts celebrate multiple perspectives.
One of their large lessons is that there are many ways to see and interpret the world.

4. The arts teach children that in complex forms of problem solving purposes are seldom fixed, but change with circumstance and opportunity. Learning in the arts requires the ability and a willingness to surrender to the unanticipated possibilities of the work as it unfolds.

5. The arts make vivid the fact that neither words in their literal form nor numbers exhaust what we can know.The limits of our language do not define the limits of our cognition.

6. The arts teach students that small differences can have large effects.
The arts traffic in subtleties.

7. The arts teach students to think through and within a material.
All art forms employ some means through which images become real.

8. The arts help children learn to say what cannot be said.
When children are invited to disclose what a work of art helps them feel, they must reach into their poetic capacities to find the words that will do the job.

9. The arts enable us to have experience we can have from no other source and through such experience to discover the range and variety of what we are capable of feeling.

10. The arts' position in the school curriculum symbolizes to the young what adults believe is important.


SOURCE: Eisner, E. (2002). The Arts and the Creation of Mind, In Chapter 4, What the Arts Teach and How It Shows. (pp. 70-92). Yale University Press. Available from NAEA Publications. NAEA grants reprint permission for this excerpt from Ten Lessons with proper acknowledgment of its source and NAEA. 

CURRENT ASSIGNMENTS

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